Thanksgiving: Giving Thanks for Humans, Aliens, All of the Above

Giving Thanks for Humans, Aliens, All of the Above

Thanksgiving Blog ( Somewhat Preachy, but Non-sectarian)

This is Thanksgiving week in the USA. Yet, today serious problems linger in our world, making it harder to find something meaningful to say at the Thanksgiving table. Donald trump is president of the United States, and he seems determined to alienate friends of democracy and hearten the enemies of freedom. The world is, in biblical terms, “a house divided.”

And not just among nations, too often closer to home. At home, actually.

Capital of the World

In his short story, “Capital of the World,” Ernest Hemingway illustrated how the far “House Divided” reaches.  The story, based on an old Spanish tale, was set in Madrid. A father and his son, Paco, had a terrible argument, and the son left home. When the father cooled down he tried to find Paco. He searched all his familiar hang-outs for months with no success. Finally, in desperation, the father turned to the newspaper for help. His ad simply read, “Dear Paco, meet me in front of this newspaper office at noon on Saturday. All is forgiven. I love you. Your father.” On the appointed Saturday, eight hundred young men named Paco showed up, every one of them looking for forgiveness and love from their estranged fathers.

Well, it’s just a story…or is it?

The world is a house divided

The world is a house divided. Every town and village is filled with people who desperately long for reconciliation—with each other, and with themselves.

Too many children grow with family quarrels and regular conflict as the normal daily fare. Not just domestic violence or abusive behavior—all of which is a form of pathology—but ordinary, nonviolent families will fight. We writers count on it. What would a sitcom be without screaming arguments later resolved?

Okay, let’s face it: when you live with other people, sometimes you’re going to disappoint them. And sometimes they’re going to disappoint you. We used to say, “A man’s home is his castle.”  Anybody who’s lived long enough knows how quickly a domestic castle can settle into a four-season pattern of siege warfare.

Sometimes, we feel separated

Sometimes, we feel separated from even our closest loved ones. It’s the price you pay for the privilege of having a human body. Unless you’re an empath—like Esteban Solorio in my Star Lawyers series–you’re inside your head, they’re inside theirs. And it seems the longer you live with someone, the more you know about them, the less likely you are to actually listen to what they have to say. The little daily squabbles inside your domestic castle, especially with children, can teach you quickly that just because you have a castle doesn’t make you an absolute monarch.

People you love occasionally disappoint you

May I reveal a secret of the ages here, for anyone who hasn’t realized it yet?  People you love occasionally disappoint you, just as you occasionally disappoint them. It isn’t because they don’t love you. It isn’t moral failure. It’s just the nature of the human psyche. People have bad days. People get lazy about things you passionately care about. And they don’t always know what you care passionately about, regardless how long you’ve been sharing the refrigerator. You’re not Cousin Esteban. Nobody is inside your head but you.

How much better to delete all moral and ethical subroutines from the circumstances which make you crazy? (Hint: When the kids forget to take out the garbage, it’s not for the express purpose of driving you stark raving mad.) Many people live in a house divided, but this week marks a pause when families gather. Thanksgiving. reconciliation is possible. The image of God—whatever god you acknowledge–is available in each person. Even your kids and that asshole boss you work for.

Our homes can be a house divided

Our homes can be a house divided. Family conflicts are commonplace, but also conflicts at work. Turf wars, disloyalty and deception, infighting and passive aggressive behavior can waste time and keep a business from realizing its true potential. Believe it or not, there is scientific evidence that cooperation (even among assholes) brings substantial benefit to all.

At a county fair, the townspeople held a horse-pulling contest. The first-place horse ended up moving a sled weighing 4,500 pounds. The second-place finisher pulled 4,000 pounds. The owners of the two horses decided to see what these horses could pull together. They hitched them up and found that the team could move 12,000 pounds. By working separately, the two horses were good for only 8,500 pounds. When coupled together, their synergism produced an added 3,500 pounds. It’s a hard lesson for us, but unity of purpose consistently produces greater results than individual efforts. Teamwork divides the effort and multiplies the effect.

And it goes beyond the workplace. Racism, sexism, homophobia, and nationalism…the environmental abuse of the Earth, too. If we feel separate from and superior to nature, as if we are floating on top of the ecosystem—walking paved streets, cruising along on asphalt roads, never touching the soil of the planet from which we evolved—how much easier it is to suck all the oil and fossil fuels from the veins of the Earth, like energy vampires? If we are alienated from our organic link to Mother Earth, why should we care if global warming melts the icecaps, or the barrier reefs and rain forests disappear, or the oceans are fished out, or species after species of land animals, fish, and birds go extinct?

And as a sci-fi writer, I tremble for the ecosystems we might despoil on Earth-like worlds yet to be discovered.

Yet, there is reason to hope

Yet, there is reason to hope. Responsible scientists are working on the problem, even if we can’t seem to get the President of the United States to admit that global warming even exists.

And there is the tree of Nagasaki. After the atomic bomb was dropped, scientists predicted nothing would grow there for decades. Yet, the plants came back rather quickly. More astonishingly, a slender sapling survived the blast and is today a great tree which puts out new leaves every year.

Halfway around the globe in the jungles of Africa, naturalist Jane Goodall carries a leaf with her from the lone tree of Nagasaki as she goes about her work with the chimpanzees in Tanzania. Jane Goodall says one of her reasons for hope is nature’s amazing resilience, which the Nagasaki leaf symbolizes to her.

So, thinking of all of the above this Thanksgiving, let’s envision a better world, where humanity comes together as one people, and voyages to the stars as mature adults who respect all cultures and protect all ecosystems, regardless of how exotic or alien.

Cooperation and love “trump” egomania and hate

Let’s send a message to the people in our lives that—regardless of the pathologically bad model shoved at us by Donald Trump’s abusive, ignorant, political reality show—cooperation and love “trump” egomania and hate, on every world in the Cosmos. Terra included. We want to reconcile, not alienate.

Paco, come home. All is forgiven…

Tom Shepherd

Tucson, AZ

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.