Report from 20Booksto50K Writers

20booksto50k writers

Report from 20Booksto50K Writers

Okay, so you gather 700+ Indie writers and media professionals.

Where ya gonna meet?

LAS VEGAS 2018

Every year the FB community called 20Booksto50K assembles at Sam’s Town Hotel & Casino (the latter a Vegas requirement) for three days of meetings, lectures, and pep rallies about Independent Publishing (A.K.A., Indie). The minnows and the whales, all in one pool. (No sharks allowed. Tyler’s Space Marines blasted them in the parking lot. Oh, right. You don’t know about the Marine Detachment soon to be assigned to the Patrick Henry, do you? But I digress…)

And the amazing thing about this trip to Las Vegas was that slot machines were everywhere, but yours truly did not spend a Galactic Credit on gambling, even though I carried my Bank of Rahjen debit card, zipped inside the pocket of my yellow, M-double-I jumpsuit.

Indie giants

Indie giants like Conference Organizer Craig Martelle, mega-bestselling sci-fi authors Michael Anderle, M.D. Cooper, and seven hundred (700) more-or-less successful writers listened to presentations on how to write better and faster to get the books you love out of their heads and into your Kindles.

Let me confess—I was a skeptic. Good books take time, and some of the guys & galz are knocking them out by the dozen. (Question, sci-fi lovers: Which genre sells the most fiction books? Answer at the bottom. No looking until I’m done talking, please.)*

And there are a lot of people writing a lot of books, as mentioned in my last blog. But I discovered it’s possible to deliver quality work to your readers much more efficiently, to find the sweet spot between craftsmanship and productivity. I’m not going to churn out novels like the “big guys” do, sometimes writing a book a month. But there are a lot of stories yet to tell in the Star Lawyers Universe, and I plan on making a conscious effort to get them into your hands as quickly as possible while maintaining the quality of work you like to read.

5-6 books per year

Optimally, that would be 5-6 books per year. That’s my target. Considering it took me two or three years to write one book in the past, it’s an optimistic, some would say whimsical attempt at trusting the muse and driving ahead. I know you will let me know if the pace is too fast and the story loses depth of characters, excitement of their struggles, or believable richness of alien cultures where Star Lawyers do their work.

So…here’s a tentative set of publication dates from now until Valentine’s Day. Keep me in your thoughts & prayers. Or cuss the fact that you have to wait until February for J.B.’s mission to the Ounta-Kadiis to save Bertie (Book 5, see below)—that works, too.

But know that I appreciate everyone who takes time from busy lives to fly with Tyler and the Star Lawyers Corp for a brief visit to their Universe. And besides… Arrested on an alien world? Who ya gonna call?

BULLETIN FOR STAR LAWYERS CREW

Works in Progress**

Star Lawyers – Book 4 – The House of the Silent Moons

[ Release date: 3 December ]

Star Lawyers Origins – Book 2 – Bad Moon Rising

[ Release date: 1 January 2019 ]

Star Lawyers – Book 5 – The Stellar Light Conspiracy

[ Release date: 14 February 2019 ]

**All release dates are tentative targets.

See you out there in the Star Lawyers Universe!

Tom Shepherd

Tucson, AZ

*Which genre sells the most fiction books? Answer: Romance. (For real. Not even close. Look it up.)

Sexy Humanoid Aliens

Sexy Humanoid Alien

Sexy Humanoid Aliens

Sexy Humanoid Aliens—How Likely?

Most sci-fi Writing—books, teleplays and screenplays—feature humans in the lead role. Makes sense. If you want to sell dog foods you need to feature a dog in the promo. But even smart dogs can’t buy their own grub, so advertising shows attractive women or men playing with and preparing delicious vittles for their four-legged friends. Humans are hopelessly anthropocentric. Probably so with any intelligent species.

But how likely is it that future explorers will encounter sexy aliens who look like garden variety Homo sapiens, plus pointy ears and oddly tinted coloring? Sci-fi writers have succumbed to the temptation with wild abandon. The conquests of Captain James Tiberius Kirk are not limited to space combat. There was that hot scene with the green “Orion slave girl.” (James Bondage?)

Humans in the Trek universe have shared beds with Betazoids (Counselor Troi—yum!), Trills, Vulcans, Bajorans, Kazons (rejected for assimilation by the Borg—yuk!), the short-lived Ocampa, and others. It’s a plot device to inject sex and romance into the pseudo-geek-speak world of running a starship at warp speed. TNG’s Riker even flirts with a pair of Klingon female warriors, whom he jokingly offers to bed in a threesome. (You dodged a phaser blast, Will. They would have killed you with rough love.)

How possible is this? Scientists have smiled politely, like visiting scholars watching a third grade Halloween pageant, then issued condescending disclaimers about the impossibility of finding human-like species in large numbers, if we ever did develop the scientifically impossible, faster-than-light technologies needed “to boldly go” where nobody’s ever gone before. (They might even mention the split infinite.)

Alien Life will be… well.. alien

After all, alien life out there will be… well… alien. To paraphrase 20th century thinker Arthur Eddington, it will be stranger than we are capable of imagining. Okay, let’s play with that thought a little. We know only one habitable planet so far. Earth, sometimes called Terra in sci-fi literature. (I use both, but favor Terra.) What happened here, on the human homeworld?

Bilaterally symmetrical, bipedal creatures have developed rather profusely. Velociraptor to Homo sapiens, who were definitely not related. Some creatures, like lemurs and grizzlies, acquired optional bipedalism—front legs to help them run—but also to manipulate edibles and climb trees. Eyeballs evolved at least forty different times along unrelated evolutionary paths.

Humanoid Aliens – Why the similarities?

Because when creatures needed to navigate their world and grasp prey, front limbs became arms and hands. When they needed to see the world by visible light, evolution provided eyes in abundance.

Evolution isn’t going somewhere; it is not a program running until it produces an advanced creature. Evolution is a response to the needs of the organism, usually from environmental or demographic pressures. Limbs with hands can manipulate tools, increasing the creature’s survival options. Opposing thumbs make gripping those tools easier. Eyes, ears, and noses consolidated in a skull containing the animal’s brain make sensory input quicker, enables comparison among sounds, scents, and sights, again providing survival benefits. And placing the mouth in the head allows a two-legged creature to watch for danger while munching fruit, leaves, or prey.

Given the advantages of the five-star, humanoid shape for the development of tools and technology, is it really likely we will encounter no other species in the galaxy who are similarly configured?

Now, if we meet comely aliens who are inclined toward mixed-species dating… You might wonder whether Tab A would fit in Slot B? That’s a question of artistic license, and from the look of busty alien princesses on the covers of sci-fi literature, I think that license has not yet expired. (Thank you, Cap’n Kirk!)

In my Books

See the first volume in my new series, Star Lawyers Book 1 – Jump Gate Omega, to meet the Suryadivans, humanoid aliens who are not sexually compatible with Homo sapiens. (The blue-skinned, green-blooded, and seriously hot Empress Veraposta doesn’t appear until Book 3.)

Knife Fight at Olathe-5

Star Lawyers Book 1 – Jump Gate Omega releases June 10thmeantime, my prequel to the series is available and you can Download my free short story here!

You can also learn more about me in the about section of this website.