Aliens Make Nice Bedfellows… well, some of them.

Alien Diversity

Note about Alien Diversity from Dr. Tom’s Desk*

Reviewers and informal correspondents often remark about the array of alien races, planets, cultures and religions encountered in the main Star Lawyers series and its prequel spinoff, Star Lawyers Origins. Readers often comment positively on the multi-cultural spacefaring society I envision for the 32nd century. The complexity is usually well received, but one wag lodged an exasperated complaint that there was too much diversity!

Hello? A future where vast numbers of Earth’s people originate from non-European ancestry is not only likely, it’s already here. Currently, 75% of the human race lives on two continents: Asia (60%) and Africa (15%).

But let’s tie Donald Trump’s knickers in a knot and think about the untold trillions of undocumented aliens who live somewhere, out there.

I have had fun creating an even more complex picture of humanoid and non-humanoid star nations, species, races. (Using the word species and race interchangeably, rather than the limited and basically useless designation of “race” among our one-species human culture.) Here are some of the major players in 32nd century galactic civilization.

NON-HUMANOIDS (Excerpt from Jump Gate Omega):

“The majority of alien lifeforms differ wildly from the children of Earth. Insectoid Yegosians and reptilian Saurians. Sentient creatures with hard shells and multiple limbs but no head. Others looked like big luffa sponges with a few dozen garden hoses drooping off the moist membranes. There were brainy birds, intelligent vapor clouds who solidified to grasp tools or prey, and assorted races of sentient beings whose form and function defied human language to describe them without sounding nightmarish or just plain silly…

“(However) some humanoid aliens—Meklavites, Parvians, Quirt-Thymeans and others—were similar enough to Terrans to allow sexual—albeit not reproductive—compatibility… In some humanoids, the DNA double helix twisted left, instead of its “normal” right-handed form. But structural similarities abounded among bipedal humanoids. It was a maddening question.

“Then Wolfgang Ziegler offered an elegant, simple solution. In his twenty-fourth century work, Humanoid Efficiency, Ziegler theorized that, since there are a finite number of ways a creature can solve its evolutionary problems, similarities are bound to occur.”

HUMANOIDS

So, let’s run with Ziegler’s similarities. Here’s a sampler of four humanoid races whose political and social goals either align with humans or present no current threat in the 32nd century of Tyler Matthews.

Suryadivans – warm-blooded humanoid marsupial-amphibians with large, expressive head-fins. Not sexually compatible with H-sapiens. (Sorry, Captain Kirk. Neither are the green, plant-evolved, bipedal Kolovite women.) The Suryadivan Sacred Protectorate is the location for most of the action in Jump Gate Omega and Forbidden Sanctuary (Star Lawyers Books 1 & 2).

Quirt-Thymeans – Mr. Blue (A.K.A., Indigo, Prince Zenna) is a member of the humanoid race who founded the ancient Quirt-Thymean Empire. Although they are a single species, Thymeans are purple, Quirts blue. QTs are physically and sexually compatible with humans, albeit with short, doggy ears. Some scientists believe Quirts and humans might even be able to interbreed, with a little bio-tinkering. Mr. Blue frequently drives Tyler batty with his misreading of Terran metaphors and his indirect, high context way of communicating.

Meklavites –humanoid species, biologically compatible with Terrans. The Meklavite Union is a female-dominated oligarchical state in which women rule and men are subordinate. Mek women of means may form a Stable, essentially a harem, with as many husbands as they can financially support. This widespread practice of polygamy creates shortages of men, which means large numbers of middle-class women will never marry or have children. The major religion of the multi-planet, Meklavite Union is best described as witchcraft, with presiding witches and covens at ascending levels of the society.

Parvians – the Parvian Republic is home to the most compatible humanoid species yet encountered. (Until Book 5 – The Stellar Light Conspiracy, launching in May-June) Parvians have a well-earned reputation for ferocity among spacefaring civilizations. However, they are not expansionist and use their naval strength to keep the peace. As Noah Matthews says in Book 5, my work-in-progress, “Parves don’t start fights. They finish them.” They are loyal friends and merciless foes. Physically they are slightly smaller than the average Terran and well-proportioned, with multi-hued complexions, deep brown to pale beige, Afro-black to Norse blonde hair. Their species is known for its affability, zest for life, and for visiting devastation on anyone foolhardy enough to attack them. The common, cross-cultural watchword for dealing with citizens of the Republic: “Don’t fuck with the Parves.”

More alien species/races/cultures will appear in future books. If you want a hint, take a look at the gathering aboard Hakkian Granth’s flagship in Star Lawyers Origins Book 1 – Stardate.

Tom Shepherd

Tucson, AZ

*(No, I can’t write you a prescription for Medical 420. I’m a retired graduate school professor of religious studies.)

Alien Civilizations and The Postage Stamp Theory

Postage Stamp

Alien Civilizations and The Postage Stamp Theory

Where are they?

Just a few thoughts from a true believer in spacefaring, alien civilizations, who nevertheless wonders, with Physicist Enrico Fermi:

Alien Civilization

“Where are they?”

What are the odds that we are alone in the Cosmos?

Bio-Diversity on Alien Worlds

Let’s put it this way…

 

Las Vegas wouldn’t take the bet…

Astronomer Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan - Astronomer
Carl Sagan – Astronomer

Astronomer Carl Sagan:  “With a third or a half a trillion stars in our Milky Way Galaxy alone, could ours be the only one accompanied by an inhabited planet?”

 

 

 

 

 

“How much more likely it is that technical civilizations are a cosmic commonplace, that the Galaxy is pulsing and humming with advanced societies, and, therefore, that the nearest culture is not so very far away…”

Night Sky

“Perhaps when we look up at the sky at night, near one of those faint pin-points of light is a world on which someone quite different from us is  then glancing idly at a star we call the Sun and entertaining, for just a moment, an outrageous speculation.”

Sagan said a conservative estimate of the number of advanced civilizations in our galaxy alone runs into the millions.

Billions of galaxies, each with billions of stars…

The likelihood that Earth is the only inhabited world in that vast ocean of galaxies is incomprehensibly slight.

But let’s dispense with the lingering UFO issues…

The “Postage Stamp” Theory

A Galaxy

The Cosmos is so vast that space-faring aliens might never find us.

 

 

 

 

But assuming our world has been visited sometime in the past—when could it have happened?

Empire State Building
Empire State Building

Let the Empire State Building represent the geological age of the Earth, about 4.5 billion years.

 

 

 

 

 


Ruler
On the top of the Empire State Building, place a 12-inch (30.48 cm) ruler.

This represents how long our humanoid ancestors have walked the earth.
Dime

 

On the top of the ruler, place a dime, flat.

This represents recorded history since about 7,000 B.C.E.

 

 

 

 

 

Postage Stamp

On top of the dime, slap a postage stamp.

 

The postage stamp represents “modern” times, about 500 yrs, 16th – 21st centuries.

 

 

 

Empire State Building
Empire State Building

If we have been visited it was likely  sometime way down on the 10th floor, or the 87th floor.

 

Separated from us by hundreds of millions or perhaps even billions of years.

Pale Blue Dot

In 1990, Astronomer Carl Sagan convinced mission controllers to turn the Voyager I cameras homeward and snap a picture of Earth.

Some scientists considered it a frivolous request, but the photo has become one of the best-known symbols of humanity’s place in the Cosmos.

Pale Blue Dot“That’s home. That’s us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived, lived out their lives.

“The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there on a mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.”

Carl Sagan

If all those UFO sightings are valid…

Either we’re astride a major traffic lane or they’ve decided humans are fun to watch.

Isn’t it more likely that our neighbors haven’t found us yet?

Could you pick up the right grain of sand, out of all the beaches and deserts on Earth, surface to bedrock?

So, let’s celebrate Discovery Day in advance. One day, one of our descendants will make First Contact with an alien civilization.

I’m secretly hoping some of my brothers and sisters who write sci-fi have guessed wrong about everybody shooting up the galaxy out there, a la the 19th century American Wild West or current Afghanistan, pick your favorite analogy.

So, let’s boldly go their through the avenues of imagination, with firm belief our great-grandchildren—or theirs—will crew the first human starships and find friends/foes to contact in whatever manner is appropriate.

The motto of my Star Lawyers series seems to be, “Trust in galactic civilization, but go out there packing…”

See you aboard the Patrick Henry soon!

Dr. Tom

Tucson, AZ

Knife Fight at Olathe-5

Jump Gate Omega (Star Lawyers Book 1) and Forbidden Sanctuary (Star Lawyers Book 2) and The Blue King Murders (Star Lawyers Book 3) are live. If you didn’t read it yet, the prequel to the series is also available and you can Download my free short story here!

You can also learn more about me in the about section of this website.

 

A Few Thoughts about Space Pirates

Space Pirates

A Few Thoughts about Space Pirates

“Raise the Jolly Roger, an’ go to FTL, me hearties!”

Yeah, pirates in the movies are campy, stereotyped, and ridiculous. But will real space outlaws be out there some day, laying in wait for fat ships to board?

The word for today:  Avast, Ye Scurvy Dogs!”

(Teaching point from retired professor: Nobody spoke like that, except a few dozen Hollywood buccaneers in the 1950s.)

Professional Space Bandits

My introduction to professional space bandits was the low-budget, “comic science fiction” motion picture, The Ice Pirates (1980).  The opening scenes were provocative enough to make me eager for the plot to develop. Buccaneers in space ships, attacking ice freighters to steal the most valuable resource in the galaxy, dihydrogen oxide, a.k.a., water. Back in the 80s, most scientists thought water was a rare commodity, and our big blue marble, with three-fifths of its surface covered by oceans, marked a stunning exception to the rule. So, yeah. Steal the ice, It’s rare and hella valuable.

Ice is not rare

Except its not. In our solar system alone, outer planet gas giants have several large, cold moons orbiting them with vast amounts of water under the permanently frozen surface. “It is estimated that Europa has an outer layer of water around 100 km (62 mi) thick; a part frozen as its crust, and a part as a liquid ocean underneath the ice.” That would give Jupiter’s moon three times more water than all the oceans on earth combined.” And Saturn’s moon, Titan, plus even poor, demoted Pluto may have hidden oceans below. Turns out, water is plentiful throughout the Cosmos. There are vast clouds of it in distant galaxies.

Okay…that’s quibbling. The point is, the Ice Pirates concept quickly got shanghaied by terrible screenplay writing, which deteriorated from a potentially good story to a badly plotted farce that Mel Brooks would’ve rejected as neither funny nor adventurous.

Piracy in the Modern Era

The idea of piracy in a modern world resurfaced after the murderous, for-profit attacks on shipping by Somalian gunmen, called pirates by modern media. We say, “No! They are bad guys, not Johnny Depp trying to get drunk and/or laid and keep his captaincy against hordes of un-dead…” But despite its popularity, the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise presents another series of farces that might’ve been better as a real buccaneering story with comic overtones but without the botched attempts at fantasy. And it never touches the criminal aspects of piracy and its toll on the innocent.

Pirates—true pirates—were not loveable rogues like Jack Sparrow. They were generally far worse than the thugs who board unarmed merchant ships off the horn of Africa to seize cargo and take prisoners for ransom; and they often acted despicably toward their captives.

I just finished reading Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. The Barbary Coast War in the opening decades of the 19th century happened because European powers were paying off North African privateers sailing under the authority of local rulers and attacking, enslaving, and robbing every nation who was not meeting their demands for annual tribute.

The USA was a new country and couldn’t afford the extortion, and when sailors and civilians were imprisoned in slave labor camps for years while the new democracy figured out what to do, the pirates kept up their reign of terror. Finally, peace-loving Thomas Jefferson was so fed up with the attacks on civilian shipping he bludgeoned the Congress to fund new ships and sent a small flotilla into the Mediterranean. The US Marine Corps Hymn celebrates their achievement in a single line of the opening stanza, “To the shores of Tripoli…”

Actual corsairs, not the Hollywood fantasy creatures, came in two basic types, which had nothing to do with how they treated prisoners.

  1. Privateers sailed with the blessings of some recognizable government, which chartered their maritime adventures against adversary nations and often allowed them to rape women passengers, pillage and plunder the ships, and enslave anyone on the vessel. They also took the captured ships as prizes of war, to be sold or converted into more attack ships.
  2. Pirates (a.k.a., buccaneers) were beholden to no one but themselves. They often had complex societies with codes of behavior and ruling councils. Believe it or not, they usually functioned democratically. This was because anybody who didn’t agree with the group decisions could (and did) jump ship and rejoin ordinary life, subject to recognition by non-pirates who promptly tried and hanged them when discovered. They were not happy-go-lucky, Captain Jack Sparrow-types. Nor were they forced to a life of piracy by tyrannous governments. They were rapacious, murdering thieves and were treated accordingly when apprehended by legitimate authorities.1

Piracy in the Future

So, assuming humans discover how to travel Faster Than Light and set up colony worlds and commerce with alien civilizations, will we find pirates or privateers lurking out there, awaiting a good payday by waylaying lightly defended merchant ships?

Of course not, some might say, it could never happen. When we go to the stars, people will be more enlightened, better self-disciplined, and disinterested in personal profit.

Unfortunately, humanity has proven to be remarkably resistant to peaceful ways. When inner city youth gangs defend their territory and earn profits through drug sales, armed robbery, and other extra-legal means, are they responding to the ancient drive within our species to “dominate or be dominated” as the motto of the old Parvian Republic says? (Star Lawyers, Book 4 – House of the Silent Moons, work in progress).

Pirates have plagued shipping on Earth since before the days of Julius Caesar. As a boy, Caesar was captured and held for ransom by Mediterranean pirates. The brigands were amused when young Julius told them that, when he was free, he would return and wipe them out to the last man. They weren’t laughing when he came back with a fleet and kept his promise.

While there were solitary corsairs, many organized themselves into groups whose efficiency at plunder fell somewhere between street gangs and the mafia. Their driving force wasn’t cruelty—although they often plied their trade with brutality and utter disregard for the well-being of their captives. It was personal profit. When the well-known bank robber Willie Sutton was asked why he robbed banks, he infamously replied, “Because that’s where the money is.” Won’t the same be true when convoys carrying goods or passengers between star systems present an appealing target for men (or women) with fast ships and few scruples?

I assume the space pirates scenario is at least plausible, because it supports the main storyline in Star Lawyers – Book 4 – House of the Silent Moons. (Work in progress. Release target: Oct-Nov., 2018.) While writing the book, I am trying to create memorable characters with a bit of the “Avast ye scurvy dogs!” attitude without using those silly, stereotypical words. And I’m struggling to understand how organize gangs of thieves—like the Somalian pirates—view the world in which they ply their trade.

They do it because they’re bad people

It’s too easy to say, “They do it because they’re bad people.” Nobody is born a bad person, but some of us choose behaviors which can be objectively described as anti-social, even while participating in a sociopathic subculture (gangs, pirate crews, jihadists, the KKK) which is far from the mainstream and harmful to innocent bystanders. The question of what makes someone do “bad” things has yet to find a satisfactory answer. My books wrestle with the gray areas and even the “good guys” do things which result in harm to others.

I’ve never wanted to harm another person. I specifically volunteered to fly Medical Evacuation helicopters in Vietnam to avoid being the agent of death. Yet, when I was shot down on the Laotian border in 1971, I found myself on the Ho Chi Minh trail with a .38 revolver as my only weapon. There were several moments when I thought the “enemy” was coming and I pulled the pistol and realized, unlike Gandhi, I could kill in the “right” circumstances Fortunately, I never had to fire, and the American soldiers whose wounded I was trying to extract protected my crew and me until we could climb to a landing zone and get picked up by another Medevac helicopter.

The human family is full of heroes and predators

There are people who would never shoot, even to save their lives. And there are people who kill to gain wealth or personal power. The human family is full of heroes and predators. It is this mixed, contradictory consciousness we will one day take to the stars.

I am not certain there will be vast wars among alien races in which humans will find themselves targets and shooters. But I am certain that all the complex factors at play throughout our history on this planet will travel with us into the Cosmos. And I suspect other sentient races share this struggle between the angels and devils in their consciousness. It’s the price of free will.

So, dodge the pirates, touch down upon alien worlds, go forth among new species, and expect to be surprised. And remember to lock your parked starship.

For more about pirates and privateers, I recommend The Invisible Hook: The Hidden Economics of Pirates by Peter T. Leeson. (No, it is NOT an economics textbook, just a crummy subtitle.)

Don’t forget your free copy of the Star Lawyers prequel short-story, “Knife-Fight at Olathe-5”, because the hapless asteroid miner, Bertie Winther, will reappear in House of the Silent Moons.

“Dr. Tom”

Tucson, AZ

28 August 2018

[1] The lone exception might be French hunters living on the tiny Caribbean island of Tortuga in the 1630s. The Spanish drove most French forces from the area and tried to evict the French-speaking Tortuga settlers by systematically killing off the island’s game animals. The settlers resorted to piracy to make a living.

Knife Fight at Olathe-5

Jump Gate Omega (Star Lawyers Book 1) and Forbidden Sanctuary (Star Lawyers Book 2) and The Blue King Murders (Star Lawyers Book 3) are live. If you didn’t read it yet, the prequel to the series is also available and you can Download my free short story here!

You can also learn more about me in the about section of this website.

Disease from Alien Worlds? Living amongst the Stars

Alien Disease

Alien Disease

Dying of disease or indigestion under alien suns?

Blog about food, drink, and communicable disease in our journey to the stars.

The word for today is MEDICAL RESEARCH.

Admit it. You would love to swagger into a cantina on a distant world, amble to the bar, and order a big mug of Kelusian Cobalt Ale with a plate of deep-fried seafood and a side of sliced cheeses. Maybe a little Beriean bread, too. Those brown-crusted, blue-and-red baguettes taste like crunchy sourdough with a hint of salt. Yum.

And then your windpipe seizes up and you choke to death, because ale contains concentrated ethanol, and the flour for the bread comes from a local grain high in cyanide.

But don’t worry about missing the shuttle back to your ship in orbit. If you survive the toxins and poisons, you’ve already absorbed enough local pathogens—i.e., harmful bacteria, fungi, and viruses—to kill you twenty times over, so you’d only contaminate your shipmates and spread death at whatever ports you next disembark.

How serious can the threat be? I mean, space-faring travelers in sci-fi movies pay almost no attention to the dangers of contracting and passing along killer, alien diseases, like the Andromeda Strain.

Decontamination after Space Flight

But actual astronauts have taken space bugs very seriously. One of the least likely places where life might exist, even in microbial form, has to be the airless, radiation-blasted surface of Earth’s moon. Here’s what happened in part when Neil Armstrong and his crew arrived home.

A half-hour after splashdown, a frogman in an isolation suit passed three isolation suits through the spacecraft hatch… The astronauts’ exhalations and the frogmen’s inhalations were filtered… The astronauts climbed into a rubber boat and were scrubbed down with an iodine solution by a frogman. The astronauts, in turn, scrubbed down the frogman. After the crew had been lifted into the helicopter, the Apollo spacecraft got a similar scrubbing. The isolation garments and the scrubbing were phases of the elaborate precautions against possible, but unlikely, contamination by lunar organisms. [NASA Mission Report.]

The Danger of an Alien Disease

Think about the implications of treading upon a world with a viable biosphere. If you doubt the real danger, consult history books about what killed off the Aztecs (mumps, measles and smallpox), Incas (smallpox), and the indigenous population of the Hawaiian Islands (venereal diseases, measles, chicken pox, polio and tuberculosis).

All were European diseases, although some scholars have speculated that syphilis originated among the in the New World and returned to Europe as a real form of Moctezuma’s revenge. Those theories have been called into question in recent studies, but the point is well taken—bad news travels both directions.

How will we deal with contagious diseases “out there” without cauterizing every biosphere and replanting among the ashes? My book Star Lawyers Book – Jump Gate Omega forecasts advanced biofilters and high-tech smart-meds to prevent disease, plus the ability to enhance human immune systems to ward of alien pathogens.

Disease prevention in Space Ships

For the microbe threat, the Sioux City had a first-class set of bio-filters primed to destroy any contaminant lifeforms tracked inside the ship. That plus one good decon shower on the way home and he would be bug-free. Any danger to the local biosphere was also negligible, because onboard scrubbers killed all microbial and viral lifeforms on his clothes and body as he exited the ship. Well, that was the theory, anyway.

My contribution to the future of deep space settlement—which some scientists and ethicists say should not even be attempted, due to risks to alien biospheres and the possibility of corrupting natural selection/evolution on other worlds—is to make the repeated appeal for actual science, including speculative medical research, to be done about the problem before we sight our first big blue marble orbiting another sun.

If you’ve seen Avatar, you know there is no damned way the ethicists will hold back the tide of development on habitable worlds. My serious proposal is this: Let’s boldly go there, having done our homework, so we don’t kill off the natives or die from their diseases when M-double-I opens for business along Brightstar Curve.

“Dr. Tom”

Tucson, AZ

6 August 2018

Knife Fight at Olathe-5

Jump Gate Omega (Star Lawyers Book 1) and Forbidden Sanctuary (Star Lawyers Book 2) and The Blue King Murders (Star Lawyers Book 3) are live. If you didn’t read it yet, the prequel to the series is also available and you can Download my free short story here!

You can also learn more about me in the about section of this website.

Sexy Humanoid Aliens

Sexy Humanoid Alien

Sexy Humanoid Aliens

Sexy Humanoid Aliens—How Likely?

Most sci-fi Writing—books, teleplays and screenplays—feature humans in the lead role. Makes sense. If you want to sell dog foods you need to feature a dog in the promo. But even smart dogs can’t buy their own grub, so advertising shows attractive women or men playing with and preparing delicious vittles for their four-legged friends. Humans are hopelessly anthropocentric. Probably so with any intelligent species.

But how likely is it that future explorers will encounter sexy aliens who look like garden variety Homo sapiens, plus pointy ears and oddly tinted coloring? Sci-fi writers have succumbed to the temptation with wild abandon. The conquests of Captain James Tiberius Kirk are not limited to space combat. There was that hot scene with the green “Orion slave girl.” (James Bondage?)

Humans in the Trek universe have shared beds with Betazoids (Counselor Troi—yum!), Trills, Vulcans, Bajorans, Kazons (rejected for assimilation by the Borg—yuk!), the short-lived Ocampa, and others. It’s a plot device to inject sex and romance into the pseudo-geek-speak world of running a starship at warp speed. TNG’s Riker even flirts with a pair of Klingon female warriors, whom he jokingly offers to bed in a threesome. (You dodged a phaser blast, Will. They would have killed you with rough love.)

How possible is this? Scientists have smiled politely, like visiting scholars watching a third grade Halloween pageant, then issued condescending disclaimers about the impossibility of finding human-like species in large numbers, if we ever did develop the scientifically impossible, faster-than-light technologies needed “to boldly go” where nobody’s ever gone before. (They might even mention the split infinite.)

Alien Life will be… well.. alien

After all, alien life out there will be… well… alien. To paraphrase 20th century thinker Arthur Eddington, it will be stranger than we are capable of imagining. Okay, let’s play with that thought a little. We know only one habitable planet so far. Earth, sometimes called Terra in sci-fi literature. (I use both, but favor Terra.) What happened here, on the human homeworld?

Bilaterally symmetrical, bipedal creatures have developed rather profusely. Velociraptor to Homo sapiens, who were definitely not related. Some creatures, like lemurs and grizzlies, acquired optional bipedalism—front legs to help them run—but also to manipulate edibles and climb trees. Eyeballs evolved at least forty different times along unrelated evolutionary paths.

Humanoid Aliens – Why the similarities?

Because when creatures needed to navigate their world and grasp prey, front limbs became arms and hands. When they needed to see the world by visible light, evolution provided eyes in abundance.

Evolution isn’t going somewhere; it is not a program running until it produces an advanced creature. Evolution is a response to the needs of the organism, usually from environmental or demographic pressures. Limbs with hands can manipulate tools, increasing the creature’s survival options. Opposing thumbs make gripping those tools easier. Eyes, ears, and noses consolidated in a skull containing the animal’s brain make sensory input quicker, enables comparison among sounds, scents, and sights, again providing survival benefits. And placing the mouth in the head allows a two-legged creature to watch for danger while munching fruit, leaves, or prey.

Given the advantages of the five-star, humanoid shape for the development of tools and technology, is it really likely we will encounter no other species in the galaxy who are similarly configured?

Now, if we meet comely aliens who are inclined toward mixed-species dating… You might wonder whether Tab A would fit in Slot B? That’s a question of artistic license, and from the look of busty alien princesses on the covers of sci-fi literature, I think that license has not yet expired. (Thank you, Cap’n Kirk!)

In my Books

See the first volume in my new series, Star Lawyers Book 1 – Jump Gate Omega, to meet the Suryadivans, humanoid aliens who are not sexually compatible with Homo sapiens. (The blue-skinned, green-blooded, and seriously hot Empress Veraposta doesn’t appear until Book 3.)

Knife Fight at Olathe-5

Star Lawyers Book 1 – Jump Gate Omega releases June 10thmeantime, my prequel to the series is available and you can Download my free short story here!

You can also learn more about me in the about section of this website.